Acura ILX

2016 Acura ILX

The Acura ILX gets a significant makeover for 2016. One of a handful of compact sedans in the growing entry-level luxury segment, the 2016 ILX benefits from a new high-performance engine, a new 8-speed transmission, retuned suspension and steering, a reinforced chassis, fresh styling, an upgraded interior, and updated technology.

All 2016 Acura ILX models come with Hondas 2.4-liter direct-injected four-cylinder engine, good for 210 horsepower and 180 pound-feet of torque. The transmission is an 8-speed dual-clutch transmission (DCT) with a torque converter, borrowed from Acuras midsize TLX.

The gearbox is significant, because its the first application to pair a dual-clutch transmission, which usually operates on its own like an automatic, with a torque converter, used historically with automatic transmissions. What this means for the driver is smoother shifts off the line and at lower speeds, unlike standalone DCTs, whose shifts can feel abrupt. We put the transmission to the test on demanding roads, and found it capable and smooth, especially in Sport mode. In fact, we found it one of the most significant improvements compared to the outgoing model.

Exterior design of the 2016 ILX is more refined than the previous-generation (2013-2015) car. A new front fascia uses Acuras new signature front grille and five square-shaped jewel headlamps, which are also used on the newest Acura TLX. A new A-Spec package makes the 2016 ILX look more aggressive, with round fog lamps mounted in the flared lower air intakes, sculpted side sills, unique 17-inch wheels and a rear spoiler.

Inside, design and materials are greatly improved for 2016, with soft-touch materials and sporty touches like contrast stitching on the steering wheel. The A-Spec package gets a black interior with suede-like seat inserts, as well as aluminum pedals.

New in-car technology for 2016 includes a tethered navigation system for the mid-level ILX Premium, which allows users to pipe navigation information from their smartphone to the cars display via an Acura-specific navigation app. A new optional suite of safety features, dubbed AcuraWatch, includes adaptive cruise control, a multi-view rear camera, lane keep assist, collision mitigation and a road departure mitigation feature, which will actively steer the car back onto the road in case the driver drifts.

Another significant improvement to the 2016 Acura ILX is the steering, which feels much more responsive compared with the previous model. Steering feel is comfortable, without feeling numb or overly heavy. The ILX suspension has also been revised, and additional reinforcements around the ILX chassis makes it stiffer, which equates to improved collision safety and less body roll around turns.

Road and wind noise is reduced on the 2016 ILX thanks to thicker window glass and more sound dampening, as well as active noise cancellation, which picks up engine and road sounds from a microphone and pipes in noise-combating frequencies through the cars speakers. Though improved from the outgoing model, we still noticed some mild to moderate road noise on bumpier roads, especially with the A-Spec models larger tires.

The 2016 Acura ILX is a comfortable, capable compact sedan, with a lower starting price than those of its competitors, which include the Audi A3 sedan and the Mercedes-Benz CLA-Class, as well as the two-door BMW 2 Series. While the ILX may lack the performance and brand cachet of its German rivals, its much improved over the previous model and offers good value.


2015 Acura ILX

Introduced as a 2013 model, the Acura ILX is a premium compact sedan. For 2014, Acura ILX got more standard features, including upgraded 17-inch alloy wheels, new leather seating surfaces and leatherette door liners. An eight-way power driver's seat became standard, along with heated front seats and a Multi-Angle rear-view camera. Active Noise Cancellation was another new standard feature, promising a quieter cabin.

Apart from one new body-color choice, nothing changed for the 2015 model year. The hybrid gasoline/electric version of the ILX has been discontinued, after a short run in the marketplace, leaving only two powertrain choices. ILX will be further revised for the 2016 model year.

The Acura ILX is reasonably roomy by compact car standards. Two average-size adults can ride comfortably in the rear, with only minimal cooperation from front-seat occupants. Like almost all sedans in this premium compact class, the ILX is rated for five passengers, but that center rear position is only suitable for someone of diminutive stature, or someone you don't like.

Acura ILX shares its basic structure and powertrains with the Honda Civic, though there are as many hardware distinctions as there are similarities: Both the styling and the exterior dimensions are different. No sheetmetal is shared between the Honda and the Acura. The Acura ILX also gets more powerful engines and a more advanced front suspension. So, they are hardly the same.

Inside, the Acura ILX cabin is furnished with high-grade premium materials, with no sign of the interior cost-cutting that diminishes the latest Civics. In addition, the ILX benefits from more sound-deadening measures. Acura also claims higher rigidity for the ILX's unibody, which results in a smoother ride and better handling.

The Acura ILX rides a shorter wheelbase (105.1 inches versus 106.3), and is longer, lower, and wider than the Civic sedan: The ILX measures 179.1 inches overall, 70.6 inches wide, and 55.6 inches tall. Also, the ILX is distinguished by its more sophisticated double-wishbone front suspension.

The entry-level Acura ILX comes with a 150-horsepower 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine, driving a 5-speed automatic transmission with Sequential SportShift and Grade Logic Control. Stepping up a notch, the Acura ILX 2.4L is motivated by a 201-horsepower 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine, paired with a close-ratio 6-speed manual gearbox (no automatic option with the 2.4-liter).

Fuel economy is significantly better with the smaller engine, though both demand Premium gasoline. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rates the 2015 Acura ILX 2.0-liter at 24/35 mpg City/Highway. With the 2.4-liter engine, EPA-estimated mileage drops to 22/31 mpg City/Highway for the ILX.

Acura ILX competes against the Audi A3, Buick Verano, and Volkswagen CC.


2014 Acura ILX

Acura ILX is a premium compact sedan introduced as a 2013 model. For 2014, Acura ILX gets more standard features, including upgraded 17-inch alloy wheels, new leather seating surfaces and leatherette door liners. An eight-way power driver's seat is now standard, along with heated front seats, a Multi-Angle rear-view camera and a new subwoofer. Active Noise Cancellation is another new standard feature, promising a quieter cabin. Most of these features were previously part of the optional Premium Package.

The Acura ILX is reasonably roomy by compact car standards. Two average-size adults can ride comfortably in the rear, with only minimal cooperation from front seat occupants. Like almost all sedans in this premium compact class, the ILX is rated for five passengers, but that center rear position is only suitable for someone of diminutive stature, or someone you don't like.

Acura ILX shares its the basic structure and powertrains with the Honda Civic though there are as many hardware distinctions as there are similarities: The styling is different and exterior dimensions are different. Inside, the Acura cabin benefits from premium materials. The Acura gets more powerful engines and a more advanced front suspension. So they are hardly the same.

The ILX rides a shorter wheelbase (105.1 inches versus 106.3), and is longer, lower, and wider than the Civic sedan: The ILX measures 179.1 inches overall, 70.6 inches wide, and 55.6 inches tall. Also, the ILX is distinguished by its more sophisticated double-wishbone front suspension.

There is no shared sheetmetal between the Honda and the Acura. The Acura ILX cabin is furnished with high-grade materials, with no sign of the interior cost-cutting that diminishes the latest Civics, and the ILX benefits from more sound-deadening measures. Acura also claims higher rigidity for the ILX's unibody, which results in a smoother ride and better handling.

The entry-level Acura ILX 2.0L comes with a 150-horsepower 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine and a 5-speed automatic with Sequential SportShift and Grade Logic Control.

Stepping up a notch, the Acura ILX 2.4L is motivated by a 201-horsepower 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine paired with a 6-speed manual gearbox (no automatic option).

There's also a gasoline-electric ILX Hybrid, a first for Acura. In the hybrid, a 111-horsepower 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine is augmented by a 23-horsepower electric motor, sandwiched between the engine and the continuously variable automatic transmission. The basic combination is identical to the one used in the Civic Hybrid, but with an intriguing distinction. In the ILX, computer management is programmed for a little more punch when tramping hard on the throttle. That extra punch, which is all but intangible, comes at the expense of fuel economy. The Civic Hybrid carries EPA ratings of 44/44 mpg City/Highway. The ILX is EPA-estimated at 39/38 mpg. Like the Civic, the ILX Hybrid includes a little dashboard button marked Eco. Punch the button, and the system computer adjusts its mapping to make the hybrid more miserly.

Acura ILX competes with the Audi A3, Buick Verano, and Volkswagen CC.


2013 Acura ILX

Acura ILX is a premium compact sedan introduced as a 2013 model. For 2014, Acura ILX gets more standard features, including upgraded 17-inch alloy wheels, new leather seating surfaces and leatherette door liners. An eight-way power driver's seat is now standard, along with heated front seats, a Multi-Angle rear-view camera and a new subwoofer. Active Noise Cancellation is another new standard feature, promising a quieter cabin. Most of these features were previously part of the optional Premium Package.

The Acura ILX is reasonably roomy by compact car standards. Two average-size adults can ride comfortably in the rear, with only minimal cooperation from front seat occupants. Like almost all sedans in this premium compact class, the ILX is rated for five passengers, but that center rear position is only suitable for someone of diminutive stature, or someone you don't like.

Acura ILX shares its the basic structure and powertrains with the Honda Civic though there are as many hardware distinctions as there are similarities: The styling is different and exterior dimensions are different. Inside, the Acura cabin benefits from premium materials. The Acura gets more powerful engines and a more advanced front suspension. So they are hardly the same.

The ILX rides a shorter wheelbase (105.1 inches versus 106.3), and is longer, lower, and wider than the Civic sedan: The ILX measures 179.1 inches overall, 70.6 inches wide, and 55.6 inches tall. Also, the ILX is distinguished by its more sophisticated double-wishbone front suspension.

There is no shared sheetmetal between the Honda and the Acura. The Acura ILX cabin is furnished with high-grade materials, with no sign of the interior cost-cutting that diminishes the latest Civics, and the ILX benefits from more sound-deadening measures. Acura also claims higher rigidity for the ILX's unibody, which results in a smoother ride and better handling.

The entry-level Acura ILX 2.0L comes with a 150-horsepower 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine and a 5-speed automatic with Sequential SportShift and Grade Logic Control.

Stepping up a notch, the Acura ILX 2.4L is motivated by a 201-horsepower 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine paired with a 6-speed manual gearbox (no automatic option).

There's also a gasoline-electric ILX Hybrid, a first for Acura. In the hybrid, a 111-horsepower 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine is augmented by a 23-horsepower electric motor, sandwiched between the engine and the continuously variable automatic transmission. The basic combination is identical to the one used in the Civic Hybrid, but with an intriguing distinction. In the ILX, computer management is programmed for a little more punch when tramping hard on the throttle. That extra punch, which is all but intangible, comes at the expense of fuel economy. The Civic Hybrid carries EPA ratings of 44/44 mpg City/Highway. The ILX is EPA-estimated at 39/38 mpg. Like the Civic, the ILX Hybrid includes a little dashboard button marked Eco. Punch the button, and the system computer adjusts its mapping to make the hybrid more miserly.

Acura ILX competes with the Audi A3, Buick Verano, and Volkswagen CC.

 

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