Acura RDX

2016 Acura RDX

The Acura RDX is a smooth and sophisticated compact crossover with the latest technology. It comes with a smooth 3.5-liter V6 that makes 279-hp and 252 lb-ft of torque, coupled to a 6-speed automatic with paddle shifters.

The RDX competes with the Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class, Volvo XC60, Audi Q5, BMW X3.

One of the changes for 2016 is a small increase to the horsepower and torque. The nose and tail have also been tweaked. Inside, heated front seats and climate vents in the rear are now standard.

The EPA fuel mileage is 20/29/23 mpg City/Highway/Combined; with all-wheel drive its 22 mpg Combined. And thats on Premium fuel. Here it loses big to the Volvo XC60, whose turbocharged 2.0-liter engine delivers 26 mpg Combined and runs fine on Regular. In the RDX, three of the six cylinders shut down to improve fuel mileage when not needed, and fire back up when they are. The driver cant feel or hear any of this.

The RDX feels like a boxy Acura sedan. Its tidy size and nimble response make it maneuverable in tight spaces and easy to park. Its balance in the curves makes it enjoyable to drive on winding two-lanes. It handles more lightly and less sporty than a BMW or Audi.

AWD with Intelligent Control is what Acura calls its all-wheel-drive system. Its been tuned in 2016 to increase the power to the rear wheels, making the RDX feel and behave a bit more like a rear-wheel-drive car under acceleration. With 2WD, traction control is standard.

Six airbags are standard, along with a rearview camera. Safety ratings for the 2015 RDX are excellent (2016 not done yet), with five stars from NHTSA and Top Safety Pick + from IIHS.


2015 Acura RDX

The Acura RDX combines engineering technology and efficiency with responsive handling, a traditional silky powertrain with 3.5-liter V6 and 6-speed automatic, clear gauges, classy leather, class-leading interior volume, and rear seats that easily flop for cargo. The RDX competes most closely with the BMW X3 and Mercedes-Benz GLK-Class.

Nothing significant has changed for the 2015 model year. RDX was completely redesigned for the 2013 model year. The 2016 RDX receives refreshed styling and upgrades to the powertrain and structure.

The 2015 Acura RDX comes with a 3.5-liter V6 rated at 273 horsepower and a 6-speed automatic transmission that incorporates manual control. The engine and transmission are both so smooth, they feel flawless. Fuel mileage is an EPA-estimated 20/28 mpg City/Highway, for an EPA Combined 23 miles per gallon with front-wheel drive.

All-wheel drive is available. Simpler and lighter than Acuras SH-AWD setup, which is used in other models, the RDXs AWD system is designed for greater fuel mileage. In about 400 miles of driving in our RDX AWD, mostly at 72 mph on the freeway but with some hilly city runs, we averaged 21.6 mpg. The EPA rates the 2015 RDX AWD at 19/27 mpg City/Highway (22 mpg Combined).

Handling is taut and precise. The steering employs what Acura calls Motion Adaptive Electric Power Steering. Reaching beyond speed-sensitive power steering, it increases or reduces the amount of effort needed to turn the wheel in either direction, based on the same sort of traction measurements that stability-control sensors receive. By instantaneously weighting the steering wheel, the system makes it harder for the driver to over-correct.

The Acura RDX suspension features Amplitude Reactive Dampers, sophisticated shock absorbers designed to offer the best of all worlds. During our test drive, we found the dampers transmitted too many sharp bumps to our spine.

The 2015 Acura RDX interior has sweeping lines and uses rich materials. Its very quiet in the cabin. Over harsh freeway surfaces, in particular, you cant hear any tire buzz, thanks to ample sound-deadening materials. Door openings are large, and the rear seats fold down with one touch.

Leather seating surfaces are standard, along with heated front seats, a power moonroof, 360-watt audio system, and Multi-Angle rearview camera. Keyless Access with pushbutton start also is standard, along with an Active Noise Control system. An optional Technology Package has all the tricks, including a power liftgate, HID (high-intensity-discharge) headlamps, and an SMS text messaging feature. Also in the Technology group is an automatic climate control system, which considers the position of the sun when adjusting the interior temperature.

The Acura RDX is manufactured in Ohio.


2014 Acura RDX

For 2013, Acura introduced the second generation of its smallest SUV. Considered all-new for 2013, the RDX was a bit bigger and heavier than before. Most notably, a 3.5-liter V6 engine replaced the original RDX's turbocharged 4-cylinder. The redesigned model was considerably more powerful, nearly as nimble, and significantly more fuel-efficient. Clearly, it was a win-win-win deal.

Except for one new body-color choice, the Acura RDX is unchanged for the 2014 model year. Acura's 3.5-liter V6 engine makes 273 horsepower, mating with a 6-speed automatic transmission (which incorporates manual control). The engine and transmission are both so smooth, they feel flawless. Fuel mileage is an EPA-estimated 20/28 mpg City/Highway, for an EPA Combined 23 miles per gallon with front-wheel drive.

All-wheel drive is available as an option. Simpler and lighter than Acura's SH-AWD setup, which is used in other models, the RDX's AWD system is designed for greater fuel mileage. In about 400 miles of driving in our RDX AWD, mostly at 72 mph on the freeway but with some hilly city runs, we averaged 21.6 mpg. The EPA rates the 2014 RDX AWD at 19/27 mpg City/Highway.

The sheetmetal was reshaped for 2013 to be sleek and aerodynamic, looking more like the larger Acura MDX. The hood is longer and sculpted than in the first generation, the grille tidier, sides cleaner, and roofline way more elegant. The wheelbase is 1.4 inches longer than the pre-2013 RDX and the track (distance between left and right wheels) was widened a bit. Handling remains taut and precise. The center of gravity is lower than in the original RDX, despite the roof being 1 inch higher.

The suspension was thoroughly redesigned on the 2013 RDX, with 18-inch wheels standard. Acura engineers in Japan worked hard to make the second-generation RDX ride and handle well, and it does: maybe even better than the smaller and sportier 2012 RDX.

Steering technology in the ILX broke new ground, with what Acura calls Motion Adaptive Electric Power Steering, which goes to the next step beyond speed-sensitive power steering. It increases or reduces the amount of effort needed to turn the wheel in either direction, based on the same sort of traction measurements that stability-control sensors receive. By instantaneously weighting the steering wheel, the system makes it harder for the driver to over-correct.

Acura's RDX suspension also features something called Amplitude Reactive Dampers: sophisticated shock absorbers designed to offer the best of all worlds. They got most of the worlds, but the dampers transmitted too many sharp bumps to our spine.

The 2014 Acura RDX interior has sweeping lines and uses rich materials. It's very quiet in the cabin; over harsh freeway surfaces in particular, you can't hear the tire buzz thanks to ample sound-deadening materials. Door openings are large, and the rear seats fold down with one touch. Leather seating surfaces are standard, along with heated front seats, a power moonroof, 360-watt audio system, and Multi-Angle rearview camera. Keyless Access with pushbutton start is standard, along with an Active Noise Control system. An optional Technology Package has all the tricks, including a power liftgate and HID (high-intensity-discharge) headlamps.

Competitors for the Acura RDX, which is manufactured in Ohio, include the BMW X3 and Mercedes-Benz GLK-Class.


2013 Acura RDX

The 2013 Acura RDX introduces the second generation of Acura's smallest SUV. RDX is all-new for 2013, a little bit bigger and heavier than before, while being considerably more powerful, nearly as nimble, and significantly more fuel-efficient. It's a win-win-win deal.

The 2013 Acura RDX features a new 3.5-liter V6 engine making 273 horsepower (up from 240), and a 6-speed manual automatic transmission (up from a 5-speed), both so smooth they feel flawless. Fuel mileage is an EPA-rated 20/28 mpg City/Highway, for an EPA Combined 23 miles per gallon with front-wheel drive.

A new all-wheel-drive system is available, simpler and lighter than Acura's SH-AWD in other models, designed for fuel mileage. In about 400 miles of driving in our RDX AWD, mostly at 72 mph on the freeway but with some hilly city runs, we averaged 21.6 mpg. The EPA rates the 2013 RDX AWD at 19/27 mpg.

The sheetmetal has been reshaped for 2013 to be sleek and aerodynamic, looking more like the larger Acura MDX. The hood is longer and sculpted than before, the grille tidier, sides cleaner, and roofline way more elegant. The wheelbase is 1.4 inches longer and the track widened a bit, and handling remains taut and precise. The center of gravity is lower despite the roof being 1 inch higher, and there's electronic power steering replacing hydraulic.

The suspension has been thoroughly redesigned on the 2013 RDX, with 18-inch wheels standard. Acura engineers in Japan worked hard to make the 2013 RDX ride and handle well, and it does, maybe even better than the smaller and sportier 2012 RDX. The steering technology breaks new ground, with what Acura calls Motion Adaptive Electric Power Steering, which goes to the next step beyond speed-sensitive power steering, by increasing or reducing the amount of effort needed to turn the wheel in either direction, based on the same sort of traction measurements that stability-control sensors receive; by instantaneously weighting the steering wheel, it makes it harder for the driver to over-correct.

The suspension also features something called Amplitude Reactive Dampers, sophisticated shock absorbers designed to offer the best of all worlds. They got most of the worlds, but the dampers transmitted too many sharp bumps to our spine. These things can be tuned out, so it's possible that this flaw might vanish in later 2013s, you never know.

The new interior has sweeping lines and uses rich materials. It's very quiet in the cabin; over harsh freeway surfaces in particular, you can't hear the tire buzz thanks to more sound-deadening materials. The door openings are large, and the rear seats fold down with one touch. Leather is standard, along with heated front seats, power moonroof, 360-watt audio system, and rearview camera. A Technology Package has all the tricks, including a power liftgate and HID headlamps.

Competitors for the Acura RDX include the BMW X3 and Mercedes-Benz GLK-Class.

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