GMC Acadia

2017 GMC Acadia

Completely redesigned, the 2017 GMC Acadia is substantially smaller and lighter than previous-generation (pre-2017) models. Vehicles typically grow bigger when they enter their next generation, but that didnt happen with this all-new three-row crossover utility vehicle.

While its predecessor sat up to eight passengers, the 2017 Acadia seats seven. Interior space remains adequate for seven passengers, though cargo room has diminished.

Snipping seven inches out of the body length and losing 740 pounds in overall mass means improved handling. We found the 2017 Acadia responds better than its predecessor to driver inputs and is a lot easier to maneuver in tight spots.

Smaller and lighter allows a smaller, more efficient powertrain, and the 2017 Acadia makes a new four-cylinder engine available as an alternative to the optional V6. Developing 194 horsepower, the new 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine is suitable for daily driving with a light load. Response is good initially, but the four-cylinder runs out of steam when pushed harder. Fuel economy is EPA-rated at 21/26 mpg City/Highway.

The 3.6-liter V6 gets the Acadia briskly underway and delivers ample reserve power for highway passing. The V6 is rated at 310 horsepower. With the V6 and front-drive, Acadia is EPA-rated at 18/25 mpg City/Highway, or 21 mpg Combined. All-wheel drive reduces the Combined estimate to 20 mpg.

A new All Terrain option includes an Active Twin Clutch all-wheel-drive system that can transfer torque both front to rear, and left to right. An All Terrain setting replaces Off Road mode in other AWD models. The All Terrain option forgoes a third-row seat, providing instead a rack that can be moved forward and back, to hold cargo in place.

Though smaller in size, the 2017 Acadia design manages to blend its family-oriented crossover status with a tough, truck-like appearance. Angular elements are still evident, but the 2017 Acadia isnt as blocky as some GMC models.

Posh Denali trim is loaded with such luxuries as a hands-free power liftgate, heated and ventilated front seats, and heated second-row seats. Acadia Denali is the only model with Continuously Variable Ride Control.

GMCs IntelliLink infotainment system retains its 8-inch touchscreen, but adds Apple Car Play and Android Auto compatibility.

Available safety features include a 360-degree camera, lane-departure warning, lane-keep assist, blind-spot monitoring, adaptive cruise control, and forward collision warning with emergency braking. The Safety Alert seat vibrates in the direction of the warning. A rear-seat reminder can warn that kids may be left in the car, or the driver is exiting.


2016 GMC Acadia

Even though GMC cemented its reputation with the production of pickup trucks, in recent years the division has also become known for crossover vehicles and SUVs. Interior space is the dominant feature of the GMC Acadia midsize crossover SUV. It can seat up to eight. In fact, passenger/cargo space is comparable to that of a minivan.

Closely related to the Chevrolet Traverse and Buick Enclave, the GMC Acadia has no tie to the brands trucks, or to its full-size, truck-based SUVs. Available with either front- or all-wheel drive, each trim level is powered by a 288-horsepower, 3.6-liter V6 that teams with a 6-speed automatic transmission.

For 2016, GMC Acadia adds 4G LTE connectivity to its OnStar telematics, which come standard. It can create a moving wi-fi hotspot. A new 2016 GMC Acadia SL base model joins the lineup, and a heated steering wheel goes into 2016 GMC Acadia Denali.

Acadia has scored well in crash tests. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) gives Acadia an overall rating of five stars. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety issued Good scores in all tests, including roof strength. GMs midsize crossovers stand out for offering a front-center airbag; which deploys forward from the right side of the drivers seat.

Upper-trim models offer active safety systems, including blind-spot monitoring, forward-collision alert, and lane-departure warning. Poshest Acadia of the lot, the Denali model includes a Dual SkyScape sunroof, as well as heated/ventilated seats and leather-trimmed upholstery. IntelliLink is available or standard, allowing the driver to integrate such online radio services as Pandora and Stitcher, using voice and touch-screen controls via Bluetooth-enabled phones.

Not only is the Acadia interior spacious, but the overall design makes good use of all that room. With the third row up, theres 24 cubic feet of cargo space. Fold down both the second- and third-row seats, and you wind up with a virtually cavernous total of 116 cubic feet.

A Color Touch Radio with touch-screen control is standard. In some Acadia versions, the screen is encircled by capacitive controls for audio and climate systems. Navigation is available as an option, as is rear-seat DVD entertainment. Available for the full model line, the entertainment system includes surround sound and ten speakers.


2014 GMC Acadia

Like the related Chevrolet Traverse, the GMC Acadia can seat seven or eight, depending on configuration, and haul a big pile of cargo. Inside and out, the Acadia is similar in size to the truck-based GMC Yukon and Chevrolet Tahoe. However, its more refined, offers sharper handling, and gets slightly better fuel mileage than a full-size SUV. Qualifying as a crossover SUV, its constructed more like a car than a truck, so its a little lighter and has a more rigid chassis than a truck does.

For 2014, Acadia gained Forward Collision Alert and Lane Departure Warning. Both features are standard on the Denali version and available for the SLT-1 and SLT-2. Each system alerts the driver with visual cues on the dashboard, as well as audible signals. All 2014 Acadia models add dual charge-only USB ports at the rear of the center console, for use by second-row occupants.

Every Acadia comes with a modern 3.6-liter V6 engine that develops 288 horsepower, a 6-speed automatic transmission, and either front- or all-wheel drive.

Choices for the 2014 Acadia range from the rental-grade SLE1 to the luxurious Denali. The GMC Acadia shares its basic structure with the Chevrolet Traverse and Buick Enclave. Acadia shoppers on tight budgets should look to the Chevrolet Traverse. And if a Denali isnt fancy enough, or you prefer even quieter and softer motoring, check out the Buick Enclave.

Acadia delivers what most people want from a full-size SUV. The driver sits high off the ground and has a commanding view of the road. The Acadia can carry a lot of cargo. We found it seats six adults comfortably. Rear-seat DVD entertainment is available, to keep the youngsters occupied.

The only places where the Acadia falls short of truck-based SUVs are in heavy-duty towing and for slogging through muck or over rugged terrain. Properly equipped, the GMC Acadia can tow 5,200 pounds, while a Yukon is rated to pull more than 8,000 pounds. The Yukon is derived from the Sierra full-size pickup, so it has greater ground clearance, low-range 4WD and a chassis designed to regularly handle terrain thats unsuitable for the Acadia. But most drivers never need that capability. Acadia offers all-wheel drive for stormy or snowy weather, and its fine for unpaved roads. Thats plenty for most people.

On the road, Acadia handles better and is smoother than Yukon and other truck-based SUVs. Driving manners are excellent, whether on country roads, rough city streets or pock-marked freeways. It rides smoothly over bumpy pavement and takes corners in a reassuring manner for a large vehicle.

The 288-horsepower, 3.6-liter V6 is responsive and efficient, and supplies good acceleration. Its 6-speed automatic transmission is smooth and efficient, further aiding fuel economy.

Acadia comes with required safety equipment, including side-curtain airbags that provide head protection, side-impact airbags for torso protection and StabiliTrak electronic stability control and other active safety features that help the driver avoid accidents.

The 2014 GMC Acadia shares its platform with the Buick Enclave and Chevrolet Traverse. It was launched as a 2007 model; the 3.6-liter V6 was revised for 2009. For 2011, the Denali luxury model was added.


2013 GMC Acadia

The GMC Acadia can seat seven or eight and haul a big pile of cargo. Acadia has been updated for the 2013 model year.

For 2013, the front and rear styling has been refreshed, the entertainment systems update and fitted with color touch-screens, mechanicals retuned for smoother operation, an airbag between the front seats added to all but base models, rear park assist and camera are now standard, and a blind-spot warning system appears on top-line versions.

Inside and out, the Acadia is similar in size to the GMC Yukon and Chevy Tahoe. It's more refined, offers sharper handling, and gets slightly better fuel mileage than a full-size SUV, however. A crossover, it's constructed more like a car than a truck, so it's a little lighter and has a more rigid body than a truck does.

Every Acadia comes with a modern 3.6-liter V6 engine of 288 horsepower, 6-speed automatic transmission, and front- or all-wheel drive.

The 2013 Acadia ranges from the rental-grade SLE1 to the luxurious Denali. The entry SL trim has been dropped. The GMC Acadia shares its basic structure with the Chevrolet Traverse and Buick Enclave. Acadia shoppers on tight budget should look to the Chevrolet Traverse. And if a Denali isn't fancy enough or you prefer even quieter and softer, check out the Buick Enclave.

Acadia delivers what most people want from a full-size SUV. The driver sits high off the ground and has a commanding view of the road. The Acadia can carry a lot of cargo. We found it seats six adults comfortably. Rear-seat DVD entertainment is available.

The only places where the Acadia falls short of truck-based SUVs are in heavy-duty towing or slogging through muck or over rugged terrain. Properly equipped, the GMC Acadia can tow 5,200 pounds, while a Yukon is rated to pull 3,000 pounds more. The Yukon is derived from the Sierra full-size pickup, so it has ground clearance, low-range 4WD and the chassis to regularly handle terrain unsuitable for the Acadia. But you may not need that capability. Acadia offers all-wheel drive for stormy or snowy weather, and it's fine for unpaved roads. That's plenty for most people.

On the road, the Acadia handles better and is smoother than a Yukon and other truck-based SUVs. It offers excellent driving manners, whether on country roads, rough city streets or pock-marked freeways. It smoothes bumpy pavement and takes corners in a reassuring manner for a large vehicle.

The 288-horsepower 3.6-liter V6 is responsive and efficient and supplies good acceleration. Its 6-speed automatic transmission is smooth and efficient, further aiding fuel economy.

Acadia comes with required safety equipment, including side-curtain airbags that provide head protection, side-impact airbags for torso protection and StabiliTrak electronic stability control and other active safety features that help the driver avoid accidents.

The GMC Acadia shares platforms with the Buick Enclave and Chevrolet Traverse. It was launched as a 2007 model; the 3.6-liter V6 was revised for 2009. For 2011, the Denali luxury model was added.

 

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