Porsche 911

2016 Porsche 911

The Porsche 911 is unique, preserving its lineage while leading the pack, for decades. Its shape is iconic, recognized by billions of people around the world.

There are six levels of performance, from the base Carrera through the Turbo S to the GT3. Each has its own looks and feel. There is a Targa-top model, as well as a convertible Cabriolet.

The 2016 Porsche 911 isnt changed, because an extensive freshening is coming for 2017. However, there is a new model, the GT3 RS, a street-legal race car, built so the actual racecar, which has its own global series, can be homologated.

One of the best sports car to drive on a race track, the 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS is stripped to the bone to save weight, with magnesium roof, carbon-fiber hood and trunk lid, carbon-fiber seats and a rollcage. Because of that cage, its only 22 pounds lighter than the GT3, with a curb weight of 3130 pounds. It uses a 4.0-liter flat-six engine making 500 horsepower and 338 pound-feet of torque, not turbocharged, mated to a racing dual-clutch seven-speed transmission. It will hit 60 mph in 3.1 seconds, 124 mph in 10.9 seconds, and more than 200 mph.

The 911 lineup starts with the Carrera, which uses a direct-injected 350-horsepower flat-six 3.4-liter engine, the S models gets a 3.8-liter with 400 hp, the GTS gets 430 hp, and the GT3 gets 475. All are rear-wheel drive.

Then the turbochargers are bolted on, and the 911 Turbo makes 520 hp and Turbo S 560 hp; both are all-wheel drive.

The transmission will be a 7-speed manual or seven-speed paddle-shifting twin-clutch.

Neither the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) nor the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) has crash-tested the 911, although too many too-fast drivers have. Its not a car to take lightly.


2014 Porsche 911

The launch of the seventh-generation Porsche 911 began with the 2012 model year, extending through 2013 and into 2014 as all the variants adopted the new platform and body. Ranking as a big leap forward, the new 991, as its called internally, replaced the outgoing 997 (2007-2011).

Three new versions are arriving for 2014: Porsche 911 Turbo and Turbo S Cabriolets, along with a redesigned, track-ready GT3 coupe.

The Porsche 911 GT3 enters its fifth generation with a new engine, transmission, chassis and body. In addition to a broad profile and rear wing, the GT3 has a new option: full-LED headlights. Active rear-wheel steering is new, and the 3.8-liter flat-six engine generates 475 horsepower. Thats sufficient for 0-60 mph acceleration in an eye-popping 3.3 seconds, according to Porsche.

Porsche also is offering a 50th Anniversary Edition, based on the 911 Carrera S. New 911 options for 2014 include LED headlights and Turbo wheels.

The redesigned Turbo and Turbo S coupes arrived late in 2013, replacing the previous-generation versions that had been sold during 2013. In addition to being all-new, Turbo coupes and Cabriolets gain active rear-wheel steering and adaptive aerodynamics, as well as a power boost. The 3.8-liter Turbo engine generates 520 horsepower, while the Turbo S promises 560 hp.

The 2014 Porsche 911 Carrera is available in coupe and Cabriolet forms. It comes in two states of tune: 350-horsepower Carrera and 400-horsepower Carrera S. The 2014 Porsche 911 Carrera 4, Carrera 4S, Carrera 4 Cabriolet, and Carrera 4S Cabriolet bring all-wheel drive into the equation. Thats a lot of models, each one a fantastic sports car. You cant buy a bad 911, though having to choose among them could be stressful, the kind of stress you want to have.

The current 991 is longer, lower and wider than the 997 before it, but the familiar profile remains. Also familiar is its rear-engine layout, featuring a horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine tuned with the latest engineering and technology yet emitting the traditional Porsche wail.

The Porsche 911 Carrera is powered by a 3.4-liter flat-six punching out 350 horsepower and 287 pound-feet of torque, with a 0-to-60 mph acceleration time of 4.4 seconds, according to Porsche. The Carrera S goes with a 3.8-liter flat-six making 400 hp and 325 lb.-ft. of torque, with a 4.1-second 0-60 time. Both engines are available with a 7-speed manual or 7-speed dual-clutch transmission, which Porsche dubs PDK (for Doppelkupplung).

Cabriolets feature an automatic soft top that can be raised or lowered in just 13 seconds, at speeds of up to 31 mph. Every Carrera variant is available as a Cabriolet.

One notable difference between this 991 generation and the prior 997 is the steering. Porsche switched from a hydraulic system to electric steering, a move that created a stir among enthusiasts. While some experts call the new steering numb, we found, unlike many of the new electric power steering systems, the electro-hydraulic system on the Porsche 911 continues to let you know precisely what the car is doing.

Another improvement was the addition of the Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC) active roll stabilization system. Porsche claims its PDCC technology enhances cornering performance by keeping the tires in their optimal position at all times, while minimizing body roll.

The Porsche 911 is surprisingly conservative when it comes to fuel economy. A lighter curb weight compared to the previous generation, combined with technologies such as auto stop/start, helps the 2014 Porsche Carrera achieve an EPA-estimated 19/27 mpg City/Highway with the manual transmission and 20/28 mpg with the PDK. The all-wheel-drive Carrera 4S is less fuel-friendly, but still reasonable for the class, at 18/26 mpg City/Highway with manual and 18/25 mpg with the PDK. Turbos get an estimate of 17/24 mpg City/Highway.

Each 2014 Porsche 911 is a markedly refined machine. The interior has the lavish appointments youd expect in a high-line sedan, with such niceties as an 18-way power drivers seat. Thatll keep you firmly in place during the hardest cornering, but its also comfortable enough to be an everyday driver.

Competitors include sports cars that can handle track days and the daily commute, such as the Aston Martin V8 Vantage or Mercedes-Benz SL-Class.


2013 Porsche 911

The launch of the seventh-generation Porsche 911 began with the 2012 model year and extends through the 2013 and 2014 model years as all the variants adopt the new platform and new body style. The new 991, as it is called internally, replaces the outgoing 997 (2007-2011). It's an interesting numbering system, but the new 991 is anything but a step backward. This seventh-generation Porsche 911 is a big leap forward from the previous generation with a totally new platform.

The 2013 Porsche 911 Carrera is available in coupe and Cabriolet forms. It comes in two states of tune, the 350-horsepower Carrera and the 400-horsepower Carrera S. The 2013 Porsche 911 Carrera 4, Carrera 4S, Carrera 4 Cabriolet, and Carrera 4S Cabriolet bring all-wheel drive into the equation. The 2014 Porsche 911 Turbo and Turbo S go on sale near the end of 2013, along with the track-ready 2014 Porsche 911 GT3. Mix and match all the combinations and it's a lot of models, each one a fantastic sports car. You can't buy a bad 911, though having to choose among them could be stressful.

The new 991 is longer, lower and wider than the 997 before it, but the familiar Porsche 911 profile remains. Also familiar is its rear-engine layout featuring a horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine emitting a traditional Porsche wail. Traditional but tuned with the latest engineering and technology.

The Porsche 911 Carrera is powered a 3.4-liter flat-six punching out 350 horsepower and 287 pound-feet of torque, with a 0 to 60 mph acceleration time of 4.4 seconds, according to Porsche. The Carrera S goes with a larger, 3.8-liter flat-six making 400 hp and 325 lb.-ft. of torque, with launch times to 60 mph of 4.1 seconds and a top speed of 189 mph. Both engines are available with a 7-speed manual or 7-speed dual-clutch transmission, which Porsche dubs PDK for Doppelkupplung. Any of the Carrera models would make fine daily transportation.

Cabriolets feature an automatic soft top that can be raised or lowered in just 13 seconds and at speeds of up to 31 mph. Every Carrera variant is available as a Cabriolet.

We've driven the 911 Carrera S, the model we expect most Porsche 911 buyers to choose. One of the notable differences between this new 991 generation and the outgoing 997 is the steering; Porsche switched from a hydraulic system to electric steering, a move that created a stir among enthusiasts. Nearly all luxury automakers have made that change nowadays, citing lightness and better efficiency. And while some experts call the new steering numb, we found, unlike many of the new electric power steering systems on other cars, the electro-hydraulic system on the Porsche 911 continues to keep you in touch more than enough to let you know precisely what the car is doing.

Another improvement over the previous generation is the addition of the Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC) active roll stabilization system. Porsche claims its PDCC technology enhances cornering performance by keeping the tires in their optimal position at all times while minimizing body roll.

The Porsche 911 is surprisingly conservative when it comes to fuel economy. A lighter curb weight compared to the previous generation, combined with technologies such as auto stop/start, helps the 2013 Porsche Carrera achieve an EPA-estimated 20/27 mpg City/Highway with the manual transmission and 19/28 mpg with the PDK. The all-wheel-drive Carrera 4S Cabriolet is the least fuel-friendly of the bunch, but still reasonable for the class, at 18/26 mpg city/highway with the manual and 19/26 mpg with the PDK.

This latest Porsche 911 is a markedly refined machine. The interior has the lavish appointments you'd expect in a high-line sedan, with such niceties as the new 18-way power driver's seat. That'll keep you firmly in place during the hardest cornering, but it's also comfortable enough to be an everyday driver. Although its base price is relatively reasonable, the options add up fast, and it's not uncommon to see 911s with astronomical stickers.

They say there is no substitute, but competition for the Porsche 911 includes sports cars that can handle track days and the daily commute including the Aston Martin V8 Vantage or Mercedes-Benz SL Class. Purer is the Lotus Evora, in both naturally aspirated and supercharged variants.



 

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